Kent Resources

Canterbury Cathedral
CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL - A World Heritage Site
[The Original but Unofficial Pages]
© P.E.Blanche 1999


Twice in its early history The Cathedral succumbed to the ravages of fire only to rise again like a monstrous phoenix from the ashes. For hundreds of years it has sat solemnly watching and often participating in the events that shaped history. In the Autumn, when the cool mists roll off the hills of St. Thomas and St. Martin and settle into the Valley of the Stour, the great towers of the edifice reach upwards towards the warmth of the sun while the houses, in what remains of the older part of the City, seem to snuggle closely around the great building as if for comfort.
Canterbury is not a large city and the sheer bulk of the Cathedral almost seems out of proportion with its surroundings. If and when one returns to the City, it is the first glimpse of the Cathedral, usually taken from the hill at Dunkirk, that draws one back to the comfort and feeling of home that can only be fully understood by the individual that has grown up in the shadow of this massive building. Hopefully, the visitor to Canterbury will at least take with them a lasting impression of the magnificence of this Church.

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Please Note:

This site is about the history of the Cathedral as it relates in particular to the City of Canterbury and the people who have been associated with it through the ages. It is not a site about the Cathedral today or the day to day running of the Cathedral. Please do not write to me about the cost of entrance, trips, tours or the hours of services. I have no direct association with the Cathedral.

Canterbury Cathedral - Autumn Mists

© P.E. Blanche 2000



A World Heritage Site

The Cathedral from Christ Church Gate

Canterbury Cathedral from the air

Canterbury Cathedral by flood-light

The Cathedral from St. Thomas' Hill

The Cathedral from the South East

Canterbury Cathedral Archives

Christ Church Gate

The Bell Harry Tower

The Great Cloisters

The Martyrdom

The Nave of the Cathedral

The Pulpit in the Nave

The South West Transept

The Warriors' Chapel

The Altar - The Warriors' Chapel.
The Crypt - The Chapel of Our Lady Undercroft

Plan of the ground floor of the Cathedral

Floor plan of the Crypt

The Queen visits Canterbury Cathedral
(Maundy Thursday, 2002)

Pictures for Students
(A few pictures available for downloading)



THE ARCHBISHOPS OF CANTERBURY:

THE DEANS OF CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL:

TOMBS AND MONUMENTS:

THE ARCHITECTURE OF THE CATHEDRAL:

Summary



THE PILGRIMS WAY IN KENT
How pilgrims have made their
way to Canterbury and the
Cathedral


 

Additional links for items associated with the Cathedral and pages which are from other sections of this site.

Canterbury Cathedral at the time of WWII
[use your "back" button to return to this page]

The Ghost of St. Thomas
[use your "back" button to return to this page]

Memorial Tablets to The Buffs in the Nave

The legend of Nell Cook and the Dark Entry


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The Dean and Chapter of Canterbury Cathedral have very kindly sanctioned the use of the pictures in this section that were taken in and around The Cathedral. Copyright of the pictures and text remains with me unless otherwise stated and are not to be reproduced by conventional or electronic means. However, please note that the text and any opinions expressed are those of the author alone and have no association whatsoever with the Dean and Chapter.
This set of pages are brought to you as part of the Kent Genealogy Resources Pages in conjunction with Canterhill Consulting [who donate time to assist in the preparation of this site].


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